A teacher who was allegedly murdered by her two students spoke about death the day before she died in a chilling final interview.

Nohema Graber, 66, of Fairfield High School, was tragically found dead underneath a tarp at Chautauqua Park, Iowa on November 3.

The teacher addressed mortality during a trip to the town's local library to look at a display that honoured the popular Mexican celebration, the Day of the Dead.

"We all know we are going to die," she said. "It’s our way of laughing at death," reported TV station KCCI.

According to court filings, preliminary evidence suggests the Spanish teacher suffered from "trauma to the head".

Following her death, two 16-year-old students Willard Noble Chaiden Miller and Jeremy Everett Goodale were charged as adults.

They were charged with first-degree homicide and conspiracy to commit first-degree homicide.

Police reportedly received a tip that Goodale published details on social media about planning the murder and a potential motive that is yet to be revealed, according to Fox News.

It has been reported that court documents indicated that investigators found blood on clothing found inside one of the boy's homes.

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The teacher was born in Xalapa, Mexico, the capital of the state of Veracruz and moved to Fairfield in the 1990s. She is thought to be a leader in the local community.

Assistant Jefferson County Attorney Patrick J. McAvan said members of the public have questioned whether the crime was racially motivated.

"We do not have any evidence at this point that suggests that," he said.

Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds ordered for all flags in the state to fly at half-mast to honour the teacher on Tuesday, reported KYouTV.com.

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"My heart goes out to the family, friends, colleagues, and students that are dealing with this tragic murder of Nohema Graber," he said.

"Ms. Graber touched countless children’s lives through her work as an educator across our state by sharing her passion of foreign language."

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