Energy crisis: Craig Mackinlay on usage of 'Putin’s gas'

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Gazprom, a state-owned Russian gas supplier has not delivered gas to Germany through Poland since Saturday and has only been transporting half the amount of gas through Ukraine to Austria and southern Germany since Sunday.

Professor Alan Riley, a gas expert has suggested that Russia has a hidden agenda and that this attack is a response to criticism aimed at Russia for their climate change policies and for not attending COP26.

Professor Riley said: “This is Moscow’s reaction to the Green Deal. The message… you will not be able to carry out the energy transition without Russian consent and only on Russian terms.

“Because we know that Gazprom has some free production capacity, the record-breaking low gas exports can only be explained by a hidden Russian agenda.”

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Why has Spain been hit so hard by the energy crisis?

Spain has been hit particularly hard by the recent energy crisis, with figures from the National Statistics Institute (INE) suggesting that the price of electricity has gone up by over 44 per cent in the last year. 

These soaring prices are due to a number of factors:

Firstly, Spain’s relative geographical isolation means it has less interconnectivity than many other European countries and therefore it has less access to the international grid.

Secondly, a lot of Spain’s gas comes from Algeria but Algeria ended a transit deal with Morocco on November 1, preventing gas from being supplied to Spain via Morocco. 

Spain was also the hardest-hit EU country by the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Its GDP shrank by 10.8 per cent in 2020. 

Energy prices rising across Europe

Rising energy prices are becoming a major problem across Europe, with a surge in demand following the coronavirus pandemic not being met with supply, thus causing prices to soar.As winter approaches prices are set to rise, even further, sending panic throughout the bloc.

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