More than 18million people in the UK have had their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine.

The government is aiming for every adult in the UK to have been offered their first vaccine against Covid-19 by July 31.

In order for those who are most at risk of the virus to be protected first, a priority list was put together by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

By April 15, the government expects the first phase of the vaccination programme to be over – meaning everyone aged above 50 will have been offered the jab – as well as those with underlying health conditions.

It had been hoped ministers would allow teachers, police and other key workers to go to the front of the queue in the second phase.

But now the JCVI has announced the new priority list for the Covid jab, which will go by age instead.

In a TV press conference, the JCVI announced the priority groups in phase two of the vaccine rollout would be people aged 40 to 49, aged 30 to 39 and aged 18 to 29.

New vaccine priority list in full

  • Matt Hancock to give press conference today on next Brits to get vaccines

Phase one Part one – everyone should have been offered by February 15

  • Residents in a care home for older adults and their carers
  • All those 80 years of age and over
  • Frontline health and social care workers
  • All those 75 years of age and over
  • All those 70 years of age and over
  • Clinically extremely vulnerable individuals (shielders)

Phase one Part two – everyone offered by April 15

  • All those aged 65-69
  • All those aged 16 to 64 with underlying health conditions –including unpaid carers, people with diabetes, learning disabilities, morbid obesity, severe mental illness and other conditions.
  • All those aged 60-64
  • All those aged 55-59
  • All those aged 50-55

Phase two – everyone offered by July 31

  • All those aged 40-49
  • All those aged 30-39
  • All those aged 18-29

Professor Wei Shen Lim, Covid-19 Chair for JCVI, said that the committee had considered a job-based list, but that age "remains a dominant factor" in risk.

He also said that switching the focus to occupations would be "untested and untried" and risks slowing down the rollout.

The expert added: "Speed is important. Getting vaccines into arms as quickly as possible is the fastest and best way to maximise benefit to the population."

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