The Points Guy logo

Another week, another round of route changes for American Airlines.

The latest additions for the Fort Worth-based carrier are to two destinations in Louisiana — Alexandria (AEX) and Lafayette (LFT). 

Starting April 2, American will fly from Charlotte (CLT) to both AEX and LFT with its regional affiliate PSA Airlines, according to Cirium schedules and confirmed by the carrier. Both flights will be operated by a CRJ-900 offering a first-class cabin, as well as extra-legroom economy and standard coach seating.

Alexandria flights will be operated once-daily in each direction, while Lafayette will be operated twice-daily in each direction. The flights are already bookable with introductory fares beginning at around $100 each way.

Want more airline-specific news? Sign up for TPG’s free new biweekly Aviation newsletter!

These aren’t new pins on AA’s route map.

The carrier already flies to both Louisiana cities from its mega-hub in Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW). Adding flights from Charlotte, however, opens up a range of connecting possibilities for American flyers living east of Dallas.

In a statement, Brian Znotins, American’s vice president of network planning said these “flights to CLT introduce several new connections up and down the East Coast and internationally as customers begin to resume travel.”

American is also boosting service to another warm-weather destination, Daytona Beach, Florida (DAB).

Last year, the carrier started seasonal service from DFW to DAB that was scheduled to run from Dec. 19, 2020 to April 5, 2021. In American’s latest schedule update, however, the new nonstop was extended through the end of the year, confirmed by Cirium schedules and the carrier.

Video: Why Spirit Airlines is falling behind (CNBC)

  • a person holding a sign: The next coronavirus relief package will likely be the first major piece of legislation for the Democrats and the battle lines are already being drawn in Congress. CNBC's Ylan Mui reports.

    Democrats draw battle lines on next Covid relief package

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a car parked on the side of a road: Among many car fans the 1990s are considered the golden age of Japanese sports cars. In the current auto market, buyer tastes have shifted toward sport utility vehicles and trucks and automakers are trimming their lineups of sedans and sports cars. But Japanese automakers such as Toyota, Honda, and Nissan continue to bet on sports cars, and some big names, such as the Toyota Supra and the Acura NSX have returned to the US.

    Why Japa automakers still bet on sports cars

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a screen shot of a man in a suit and tie: Goldman Sachs beat analysts’ expectations for fourth-quarter profit and revenue on strong performance from the firm’s equities traders and investment bankers. CNBC's Wilfred Frost breaks down the numbers.

    Goldman Sachs beats Q4 expectations on top and bottom lines

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a screen shot of Seema Mody and woman posing for a photo: Visa, Disney and Nike are among the biggest losers on the Dow this week. Danielle Shay of Simpler Trading and Craig Johnson of Piper Sandler discuss which company's could make a comeback.

    These Dow stock losers could rebound, market analysts say

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • text, chat or text message: Bank of America on Tuesday reported fourth-quarter profit that exceeded analysts' expectations as the firm released some of the cash it had set aside for loan losses. CNBC's Wilfred Frost reports.

    Bank of America posts EPS beat, revenue miss for Q4

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a person standing in front of a building: CNBC's Wilfred Frost reports that Bank of America has authorized a $3.2 billion in stock buybacks for the first quarter of this year, maintaining a dividend of $0.18 per share.

    Bank of America authorizes $3.2 billion in stock repurchases for Q1

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a person holding a sign posing for the camera: China and the U.S. are now even more closely matched in terms of their technological capabilities, says Winston Ma, adjunct professor at the New York University School of Law.

    U.S.-China tech war has already been going on for years, says professor

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a man holding a sign: The demand surge for liquefied natural gas (LNG) amid freezing temperatures in countries like China and Japan has sent spot LNG prices spiking, says Henning Gloystein at Eurasia Group.

    North Asian markets were unprepared for spike in natural gas demand amid cold wave: Eurasia Group

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a man in a newspaper: Myron Brilliant from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce says the new administration needs to resume leadership in global institutions and reset relations with China.

    U.S. needs to work with China while keeping it in check: U.S. Chamber of Commerce

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • graphical user interface, text, application: CNBC's Shep Smith reports on last-minute rules passed by the Trump administration.

    Trump issues flurry of last-minute policy changes

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • Stephanie Link holding a sign: Stephanie Link, Hightower chief investment strategist and portfolio manager, joins 'Closing Bell' to give her insight on Biden's vaccination plan moving forward.

    We need to get these fiscal packages passed, says Stephanie Link

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a man talking on a cell phone screen with text: U.S. stock futures moved higher early Tuesday as Wall Street looked to bounce back from a rough week ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration. CNBC's Seema Mody reports.

    Wall Street points to higher open to start the week

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a person standing in front of a computer: CNBC's Bob Pisani looks ahead to the day's market action.

    Stocks rebound amid hopes for new stimulus, bigger vaccine rollout

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a screen shot of Seema Mody, Jonathan Golub looking at the camera: Credit Suisse's chief U.S. equity strategist sees the reopening trade as the market story of the year.

    Wall Street is underestimating the strength of earnings season, Credit Suisse's Jonathan Golub says

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a screenshot of Jonathan Golub: Credit Suisse's Jonathan Golub sees the reopening trade as the market story of the year.

    Earnings are going to get 'better and better,' Credit Suisse's chief strategist predicts

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • Dr. Celine Gounder, of the Biden-Harris transition Covid advisory board on the difficulties states are having getting vaccine doses to citizens.

    Signs of a Covid peak, getting back to normal life

    CNBC Logo

    CNBC

  • a person holding a sign: The next coronavirus relief package will likely be the first major piece of legislation for the Democrats and the battle lines are already being drawn in Congress. CNBC's Ylan Mui reports.
    Democrats draw battle lines on next Covid relief package
    The next coronavirus relief package will likely be the first major piece of legislation for the Democrats and the battle lines are already being drawn in Congress. CNBC's Ylan Mui reports.

    CNBC Logo
    CNBC

  • a car parked on the side of a road: Among many car fans the 1990s are considered the golden age of Japanese sports cars. In the current auto market, buyer tastes have shifted toward sport utility vehicles and trucks and automakers are trimming their lineups of sedans and sports cars. But Japanese automakers such as Toyota, Honda, and Nissan continue to bet on sports cars, and some big names, such as the Toyota Supra and the Acura NSX have returned to the US.
    Why Japa automakers still bet on sports cars
    Among many car fans the 1990s are considered the golden age of Japanese sports cars. In the current auto market, buyer tastes have shifted toward sport utility vehicles and trucks and automakers are trimming their lineups of sedans and sports cars. But Japanese automakers such as Toyota, Honda, and Nissan continue to bet on sports cars, and some big names, such as the Toyota Supra and the Acura NSX have returned to the US.

    CNBC Logo
    CNBC

  • a screen shot of a man in a suit and tie: Goldman Sachs beat analysts’ expectations for fourth-quarter profit and revenue on strong performance from the firm’s equities traders and investment bankers. CNBC's Wilfred Frost breaks down the numbers.
    Goldman Sachs beats Q4 expectations on top and bottom lines
    Goldman Sachs beat analysts’ expectations for fourth-quarter profit and revenue on strong performance from the firm’s equities traders and investment bankers. CNBC's Wilfred Frost breaks down the numbers.

    CNBC Logo
    CNBC

UP NEXT

Other carriers: JetBlue temporarily suspends service to 4 more airports, extends hiatus on 4 others

American Eagle partner Mesa Airlines will fly the once-daily flight with a CRJ-900.

Another overperforming route, DFW to St. George, Utah (SGU), got a big boost over the weekend.

Previously, the once-weekly Saturday service was scheduled to end on May 1. Not only is American extending the route through the summer, but it’s also going up to daily.

The carrier confirmed to TPG that the DFW to SGU route will operate daily from April 2 to Sept. 7, operated by a SkyWest Airlines CRJ-700. However, Cirium schedules show that the St. George connection is slated to end on Nov. 5, though it’s possible that the carrier intends to further extend this route.

A common theme across all four schedule changes is the focus on outdoor-friendly destinations. With the pandemic raging, American seems to be betting that leisure-focused flyers will continue seeking vacations with built-in social distancing, like hiking in Utah or sunbathing in Florida.

Altogether, American’s moves are aimed at capturing traffic on routes where people are currently flying. Nevertheless, mid-pandemic passenger numbers and flight counts are still down significantly compared to the historic highs of 2019.

More: American Airlines adds 3 new leisure-focused routes in latest route-map adjustment

Cirium schedules show that American plans to fly 35% fewer flights in the first quarter of 2021 compared to two years prior. In February alone, the carrier is scheduled to operate 74% fewer flights than in February 2019.

Now, all eyes turn to the company’s fourth-quarter earnings, which will be announced in just over a week.

Featured image by FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images

SPONSORED: With states reopening, enjoying a meal from a restaurant no longer just means curbside pickup.

And when you do spend on dining, you should use a credit card that will maximize your rewards and potentially even score special discounts. Thanks to temporary card bonuses and changes due to coronavirus, you may even be able to score a meal at your favorite restaurant for free. 

These are the best credit cards for dining out, taking out, and ordering in to maximize every meal purchase.

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: Read Full Article