Travel + Leisure logo

Alaska officials are working ‘to find a path forward’ for cruises in its waters after Canada announced it was extending its ban on cruise ships until Feb. 28, 2022.

“Upon hearing the announcement, we immediately reached out to Canadian and American agencies to try to understand the rationale behind this decision—particularly the duration of the ban,” Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski, Sen. Dan Sullivan, and Congressman Don Young in a joint statement. “We are exploring all potential avenues, including changing existing laws, to ensure the cruise industry in Alaska resumes operations as soon as it is safe. We will fight to find a path forward.”

Loading...

Load Error

The ban prevents any ships carrying more than 100 passengers from docking in Canadian ports — which could paralyze Alaska’s tourism industry.

Due to the Passenger Vessel Service Act, a law that’s been in place for over 100 years, big foreign-flagged ships, like those operated by Royal Caribbean, are required to stop in Canada before making their way to Alaska. The law requires that these ships must call on a “distant foreign port” before returning to the U.S, Cruise Critic reported.

Video: Canada Extends Ban on Cruise Ships Until at Least 2022 (Travel + Leisure)

  • a group of people posing for the camera

    Why Meghan Markle Won’t Return to the UK With Prince Harry This Summer

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a close up of a flag

    Estonia Lifts Quarantine for Travelers With COVID Vaccine

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a sign in front of a tree

    This Tiny Home on a Ranch With Horseback Riding and Epic Stargazing Is the Most Wish-liste

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a woman standing in front of a building

    You May Soon Be Able to Unlock Your iPhone While Wearing a Mask — But There’s a Catch

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a person sitting in a car

    Cathay Pacific Relaxes Face Mask Rules for Business- and First-class Passengers

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a group of people walking on a city street

    New Orleans Bars Will Be Closed During Mardi Gras Due to COVID-19

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • Tom Brady doing a trick on a stage

    Disney World Canceled Its Super Bowl Parade but Tom Brady Will Still Celebrate Win in the

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a woman standing in a room

    Airbnb Hosts Can Request Guests' Health Information Before Checking In

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a woman standing in front of a building

    The Best Messenger Bags to Travel With, According to Thousands of Customer Reviews

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a group of people posing for the camera

    Best Places to Travel With Kids for Adventure, History, and Culture

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a person standing in front of a building

    Kentucky Distilleries All Bourbon Lovers Should Visit

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a person wearing a suit and tie posing for a photo

    Girlfriend Collective Just Launched a Collection of Gender Neutral Loungewear That Everyon

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a close up of a hillside next to a tree

    11 Best Cities to Retire in the U.S

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a group of people sitting at a table in front of a building

    This Ultra Luxe, 6-Bedroom Villa in Jamaica Has a Chef, Infinity Pool, and On-Site COVID T

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a group of people in front of a fence

    Japan Extends State of Emergency As Plans for Tokyo Olympics Continue On

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a small boat in a large body of water

    Catalina Island Reopens to Tourists With New COVID-19 Precautions

    Travel + Leisure Logo

    Travel + Leisure

  • a group of people posing for the camera
    Why Meghan Markle Won’t Return to the UK With Prince Harry This Summer
    Harry's flying solo.

    Travel + Leisure Logo
    Travel + Leisure

  • a close up of a flag
    Estonia Lifts Quarantine for Travelers With COVID Vaccine
    Officials say they will accept vaccinations from nine global suppliers.

    Travel + Leisure Logo
    Travel + Leisure

  • a sign in front of a tree
    This Tiny Home on a Ranch With Horseback Riding and Epic Stargazing Is the Most Wish-liste
    Escape the lights of Vegas for an affordable desert retreat.

    Travel + Leisure Logo
    Travel + Leisure

UP NEXT

About 2 million people visit Alaska every year. Of those visitors, almost 1.2 million — or about 60% — arrive by cruise ship, according to the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA).

In a recent statement, CLIA said that they “understand and support the government’s focus on combatting COVID-19 in Canada” but “are surprised by the length of the extension of the prohibition of cruise.”

UnCruise Adventures is one of the few cruise lines that will be able to bring passengers to Alaska this year, because it sails under the U.S. flag and does not need to visit foreign ports. It is the largest of four key operators who will be able to operate cruises this year, including Alaskan Dream Cruises, American Cruise Lines and Lindblad Expeditions, according to Cruise Industry News.

But the term “large” is relative. UnCruise operates a fleet of vessels that carry from 22 to 86 passengers each. Over the course of a typical season (which begins in April and lasts through September), UnCruise typically brings about 6,000 visitors to Alaska. That’s about how many a Royal Caribbean cruise can bring to Alaska on one single voyage.

The land border between the U.S. and Canada remains closed at this time.

Cailey Rizzo is a contributing writer for Travel Leisure, currently based in Brooklyn. You can find her on Twitter, Instagram, or at caileyrizzo.com.

Source: Read Full Article