Brexit: Lord Moylan explains how to get ‘revenge’ on EU

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And Baron Moylan has said Brussels is behaving like “the worst sort of neighbour” in its dealings with both Bern and London – while accusing it of “sucking up” to both Russia and China. Baron Moylan made his feelings plain after Switzerland pulled the plug on the deal, which would have bound Switzerland more closely to EU rules and regulations, last month.

He tweeted: “A read through the EU’s demands shows that these talks have little to do with trade and everything to do with dominating a smaller neighbour.”

He subsequently told Express.co.uk: “First of all, I have a view on free trade agreements, generally, nothing to do with the European Union, anywhere in the world.

“They are nearly always about power and getting small countries to do what the big countries want them to do.

“They’re not really about trade, I’m highly suspicious of free trade agreements.

“They’re always about imposing your labour standards, your environmental status, and so on smaller countries.”

Baron Moylan added: “That tweet was certainly true, because it’s not trade that they’re really discussing, its freedom of movement and welfare payments and things like that, that’s what it was about when you break it down.

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“But I think there is a specific point to the EU, which is why is it they have such bad relations with their democratic neighbours and spend their time sucking up to Turkey and Russia.

“They are turning against Russia now admittedly, a little bit.

“But the way you get European Union people talking about Britain is almost as if we’re worse than Russia.

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“And they spend all their time sucking up to China, but when you come from nice peaceable, democratic, like-minded friendly countries like Switzerland and Britain, they just get aggressive.”

With tensions simmering over the controversial Northern Ireland Protocol, which critics claim amounts to a border down the Irish Sea, as well as ongoing access to UK waters for EU vessels, Baron Moylan, the former chairman of the London Legacy Development Corporation, said it was now time to play hard ball.

He explained: “I think we have to be willing to turn our back on them.

“They certainly don’t see themselves as a friend of Boris and Brexit.

“They see themselves as a very cold and legalistic neighbour, the worst sort of neighbour.

“The sort of person who would report you to the local authority if you made a little bit too much noise in a party in your garden and say ‘We are in the right in reporting you because you went above a certain level of decibels’.”

Explaining the decision on May 26, a statement issued by the Swiss Government said: “The Federal Council today took the decision not to sign the agreement, and communicated this decision to the EU.

“This brings the negotiations on the draft of the Swiss-EU Institutional Trade Agreement (InstA) to a close.”

The European Commission, led by President Ursula von der Leyen, commented: “Without this agreement, this modernisation of our relationship will not be possible and our bilateral agreements will inevitably age.

“50 years have passed since the entry into force of the Free Trade Agreement, 20 years since the bilateral I and II agreements.

“Already today, they are not up to speed for what the EU and Swiss relationship should and could be.

“This is why, back in 2019, the EU insisted that this agreement was so essential for the conclusion of possible future agreements regarding Swiss further participation to the Single Market, and also an essential element for deciding upon further progress towards mutually beneficial market access.”

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