Scotland ‘can’t afford to be independent’ says Scottish voter

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Election Day 2021 is almost here and millions of people in England, Wales and Scotland will cast their ballots in several different races to elect more than 5,000 officials to positions of power. In total, about 48 million people are thought to be eligible to vote on Thursday, May 6. Voting is a privilege and therefore it is important to adhere to the rules to avoid being unable to participate.

The upcoming May 6 Welsh and Scottish parliamentary elections and local English elections could be the most important held in several years.

The parliamentary election in Scotland could have huge ramifications for the UK, with Scotland potentially seeking a second independence referendum.

Every voter in Great Britain will have the chance to take part in at least one of six elections this May.

On May 6, the following will be elected:

  • English local councils: 143 councils – about 5,000 seats
  • Scottish Parliament: 129 MSPs
  • Welsh Parliament: 60 MSs
  • Police and crime commissioners – 39 PCCs
  • London Assembly: 25 seats
  • Directly-elected mayors: 13.

Who has the right to vote?

There are different rules for voters depending on the election.

For English local elections, you must:

  • Be registered to vote
  • Be aged 18 and above on polling day
  • Be a British, Irish or EU citizen or a qualifying Commonwealth citizen.
  • Be registered at an address in the area where you want to vote
  • Not be legally excluded from voting.

To vote in Scottish Parliament elections you must be:

  • Registered to vote at an address in Scotland
  • Aged 16 and over on polling day
  • Not legally excluded from voting.

To vote in the Welsh Parliament elections, you must be:

  • Registered to vote
  • Be aged 16 and over on polling day
  • Live in Wales
  • Not legally excluded from voting.

DON’T MISS
Local elections 2021: Am I registered to vote? How to check [INSIGHT]
Local elections 2021: Who can you vote for where you live? [EXPLAINER]
Local elections 2021 explained – Everything you need to know [ANALYSIS]

Am I registered to vote? How to check if you are registered to vote

If you have received a polling card for the upcoming election at your home address, you are definitely registered to vote.

You are not required to take this polling card with you.

However, it will reveal the station where you should go to vote on polling day.

If you do not have your polling card and are unsure if you are registered or not To find out if you are registered to vote, you should contact your local Electoral Registration Office.

You can find out the details of your Electoral Registration Office here by inputting your postcode here.

You will find out your local council and be directed to the relevant contact page.

This website will also tell you who is running in your area and the address of the polling station where you should go to vote.

What if you are not registered to vote?

Unfortunately, the deadline to register to vote has now passed, which means you cannot vote on May 6 if you are not registered by now.

But you can register to vote in future elections here.

The process usually takes five minutes in total and all you need is details of your name, address and National Insurance number.

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