(Adds comments, updates prices)
    By Shreyashi Sanyal and Ambar Warrick
    April 13 (Reuters) - Currencies in Latin America slipped on
Monday amid continued concerns over the economic stress from the
coronavirus outbreak, with a decline in oil prices adding to
pressure on major exporters.
    Oil exporter Mexico's peso fell 1.1%, after a record
OPEC production curb did little to prop up oil prices in the
face of plummeting demand. 
    "The deal seems to have put a floor under oil prices, but
judging from today's reaction, investors aren't convinced that
prices will get a strong boost," said Hussein Sayed, chief
market strategist at FXTM.     
    The MSCI's index of Latin American currencies
 fell about 1.8%, while Brazil's real and
the Colombian peso retreated about 1.6% and 1.3%,
respectively. 
    While signs of the pandemic peaking in some epicenters had
propped up risk assets last week, its looming impact, as
evidenced by dismal economic indicators from across the globe,
served as a reminder that markets were not yet out of the woods.
    "As we leave the acute phase of the crisis, the market will
have to deal with the underlying data and the uncertainty of the
COVID-19 exit strategies. The latter will be piecemeal and
bumpy. It's a dance of fits and starts rather than a binary
event of economy on/off," wrote Mark McCormick, Global Head of
FX Strategy at TD Securities.
    "In turn, we expect another bump in the USD."
    Safe-haven demand had seen the dollar scaling more
than three-year highs in March, while risk assets faced waves of
panicked selling.
    Regional stocks also fell on Monday, with MSCI's index for
Latin American equities down 1.1%.      
    Amid continued signs of disruption in Brazil, car makers
Toyota and General Motors Co said they both
planned to suspend production in Latin America's biggest economy
until at least June.
    Brazil's economy will shrink this year by 5% due to the
direct and indirect economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak,
according to the World Bank, which would mark the country's
biggest crash in at least half a century.
    Brazil likely has 12 times more cases of new coronavirus
than are being officially reported by the government, with too
little testing and long waits to confirm the results, according
to a study released on Monday.
    Colombia's economy is also expected to contract in 2020, by
about 1.5% to 2%, Finance Minister Alberto Carrasquilla said on
Monday.     
    
    Key Latin American stock indexes and currencies at 2003 GMT;
    
     Stock indexes               Latest     Daily %
                                            change
 MSCI Emerging Markets             883.66      -0.51
                                           
 MSCI LatAm                       1671.75      -1.09
                                           
 Brazil Bovespa                  78649.40       1.25
                                           
 Mexico IPC                      34568.64          0
                                           
 Chile IPSA                       3859.60       2.66
                                           
 Argentina MerVal                28730.94      2.546
                                           
 Colombia COLCAP                  1193.98       0.58
                                           
                                                    
         Currencies              Latest     Daily %
                                            change
 Brazil real                       5.1819       0.01
                                           
 Mexico peso                      23.6080      -1.18
                                           
 Chile peso                         850.7      -1.42
                                           
 Colombia peso                    3858.89      -0.85
 Peru sol                          3.3857      -0.47
                                           
 Argentina peso (interbank)       65.3775      -0.33
                                           
 
 (Reporting by Shreyashi Sanyal and Ambar Warrick in Bengaluru;
editing by Jonathan Oatis and Alistair Bell)
  

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