A VW exec has confirmed that the first unit rolled off the assembly line during his recent visit.

According to a recent post on LinkedIn, shared by Electrek, the first Volkswagen ID.4 electric crossover has rolled off the assembly line at the brand’s US factory in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The information comes directly from President and CEO of Volkswagen Group of America Scott Keogh.

Volkswagen is clearly approaching official production of its all-new electric SUV on our shores, which will eventually lead to increased availability of the ID.4. As more and more people are considering EV ownership, it’s critical for automakers to make their electric vehicles readily available. This is especially true as a global chip shortage is hindering automakers, added to the fact that cars are more expensive than usual on the used market.

Just yesterday, Keogh shared a few images on LinkedIn and wrote that he was on hand to see the first ID.4 pre-production unit being completed.

Scott Keogh shared on LinkedIn:

“There are moments when you simply stop, stare, and take it all in.

That moment certainly came during my last visit to the Volkswagen Chattanooga assembly plant in Chattanooga, TN. While I was there to tour our electric vehicle expansion at the plant, I had the pleasure of watching a pre-production version of the VW ID.4 come down the line with Thomas Du Plessis.”

He goes on to explain that the early pre-production model is necessary for VW to “validate the build process, components, and procedures in advance of full assembly which is scheduled to begin next year.”

Keogh points out the VW has invested some $800 million on EV assembly for US operations. The company is also committed to offering “high-tech jobs” to keep the factory up to speed.

In closing, Keogh painted a picture with his words. He explained that as the Glacier White Metallic ID.4 was making its way to the end of the assembly line, people were cheering, and you could “feel the pride from all the great employees involved.”

Source:LinkedIn via Electrek

Source: Read Full Article