Car advertisements in France will look a bit different starting this March. The European country recently passed a law that will require automakers to advertise alternative modes of transportation in their ads to assist in the country’s effort to reduce pollution and emissions. France is allowing automakers to pick from three ad messages that alternatively suggest environmentally friendly modes of transportation.

The three are: “Consider carpooling,” “For day-to-day use, take public transportation,” or “For short trips, opt for walking or cycling,” according to France 24 via the Agence France-Presse (AFP). The law covers advertisements for TV, print, radio, and the internet, and it even has its own hashtag – “#SeDeplacerMoinsPolluer” (Move and Pollute Less). Car ads will also have to include the vehicle’s emission class.

The report also notes that automakers like Hyundai and Volkswagen are ready to comply with the law. VW told that publication that it would look at how to best comply with the new legislation with its ad agency. Failure to follow the law could result in a fine of up to €50,000 ($56,444 at current exchange rates).

The new law takes effect on March 1, and it is the country’s most recent legislation regulating automobiles. Last year, France enacted a new gas-guzzler tax on SUVs alongside legislation that would prohibit certain cars from city centers. The country also enacted a law that would see certain cars that pollute a certain amount of carbon dioxide completely banned starting in 2028.

Cities and countries worldwide are enacting new laws and regulations designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants. The UK made a move in 2020 to ban the sale of new gasoline and diesel cars in the country starting in 2030, with hybrids suffering the same fate in 2035. Automakers will likely have to contend with contradictory laws in various markets as both companies and countries transition to electric vehicles and other environmentally friendly modes of transportation.

Sources: France24, CTV News

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