Let’s dial our imaginary time machine to September 2018 when Ferrari announced the Purosangue during its Capital Markets Day. Nearly four years later, it still hasn’t been revealed, but the wait is nearly over. Come September, the house of Maranello will present its first-ever SUV, complete with the mighty V12 engine. The announcement was made today at the same Capital Markets Day event during which a few other tidbits were also disclosed.

The Prancing Horse aims to keep the Purosangue (relatively) exclusive by limiting shipments to customers to below 20 percent of total annual deliveries. In other words, no more than one in five new Ferraris sold from 2023 will be the SUV. The Italian brand continues to refrain from using the SUV term, only saying the model will be “unlike any other.”








In addition, we’re being told it’ll be a “pure V12 model,” so it’s going to be powered by a naturally aspirated engine. It’s refreshing to hear there will still be a NA V12 for a number of years what with increasingly stricter emissions regulations.

While the Purosangue will account for about 20 percent of all sales, the Icona series and the new hypercar will be far more exclusive. Ferrari says it will cap these vehicles at less than 5 percent of total deliveries, while the Special Series models like the 812 Competizione / 812 Competizione A will account for approximately 10 percent of all sales.

By 2026, 60 percent of all offerings will have hybrid and purely electric powertrains, with the remaining 40 percent represented by ICE-powered cars. Speaking of powertrains, Ferrari remains tight-lipped about how much power the V12 will deliver in the Purosangue, but we do know it pumps out 830 hp in the 812 Competizione. In addition, a more potent configuration has already been announced.

With the Purosangue, Ferrari will join the likes of Bentley, Rolls-Royce, Aston Martin, and Lamborghini on the list of high-end brands to have their very own SUVs. McLaren will allegedly follow suit by the end of the decade.

Source: Ferrari

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