Police seizing e-scooters minutes after purchase says spokesman

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Many e-scooter riders have said that high street shops and online retailers shouldn’t be allowed to sell something that they can’t use in the overwhelming majority of places. Some experts believe that the widespread nature of rental e-scooter schemes is making people believe that private e-scooters fall under the same rules.

E-scooters are considered “powered transporters” which are designated as any personal transportation device that is powered by a motor.

Because of this, e-scooters are subject to all the same legal requirements as more common vehicles, including MOT, tax licensing and specific construction.

Since e-scooters don’t always have visible rear red lights, number plates or signalling ability, they can’t legally be used on roads.

When renting scooters, the Met Police say they will issue fines of £50 for riding on the footway.

If riders are caught using a mobile phone or riding through a red light, they can be slapped with a £100 fine and six penalty points on their driving licence.

With thousands of e-scooters expected to be given as Christmas presents this year, there are fears this could lead to a spike in private e-scooter use.

Eamonn Dunne, Engagement Manager (North East) for the Thomas Pocklington Trust is campaigning for shops and online marketplaces to do more to make potential customers aware of the dangers.

Speaking to Express.co.uk, he said: “Shops need to tell prospective buyers that they are only legal on private land, using them on public land is legal and subject to certain sanctions.

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“That’s what a retailer’s responsibility is. Some websites, the messaging is there, it could be better, it could flash up or something, but it’s okay.

“When you add specific scooters to the basket, it clearly says what the legal use is.

“So when someone rides it legally, they can’t say they didn’t know. They can’t say they were made aware of the retailer. That’s responsible, but others just don’t do it.”

The Thomas Pocklington Trust is a national charity which supports blind and partially sighted people and has received a lot of feedback saying that e-scooters are becoming a real problem.

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